NERDB is the New and emerging risks database. This bibliographic database is an initiative of Nicole Palmen and Annet Lenderink with the support of Modernet and is currently powered by Obvibase.

More information on this database on the NERDB page

On the website we will publish from this month on regular updates on new disease – exposure combinations we added to the database. Currently, we have 208 entries. Ordered by year in which the abstract is published

19771201011
1988120119
19953201210
19971201313
19992201419
20021201527
20052201621
20061201735
20072201828
2008520197
20093unknown year6

Last new entries

Raulf M., Sander I., Brüning T. et al. Occupational asthma due to tampico fiber bystander exposure in a brush production company—case report and literature review Allergo J Int (2019) 28: 73. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40629-018-0085-8

A female machine operator in a brush factory presented for an expert medical examination due to suspected occupational obstructive pulmonary disease. She reported the occurrence of severe respiratory distress whenever colleagues in the same working area processed tampico fibers or a mixture of tampico fibers and bassine. As part of the further diagnostic workup, tampico fibers were isolated from the workplace and the proteins biotinylated and coupled to a streptavidin ImmunoCAP for specific IgE testing. The material taken from the workplace was checked for mite allergen contamination. In addition, a systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed on “agave-/tampico fibers and diseases.” Tampico-specific IgE antibodies (10.5 kU/l and immunoblot labeling of protein bands in the 25-kDa range) were detected in the patient’s serum. The inhibition assay showed that mite-allergen contamination of the tampico materials was not responsible for the IgE reactivity. Tampico fibers are robust fibers obtained from the leaves of the Mexican Agave lechugilla. The literature describes several cases of skin reactions in the form of irritant contact dermatitis due to occupational exposure to agave leaves or contact with agave sap. In the present case, the asthma symptoms of a female worker in a brush factory were attributed to inhalant bystander exposure to tampico fibers in the workplace. The unequivocal evidence of sensitization to tampico fibers met the medical requirements for the recognition of an occupational disease (BK 4301).

Birgitte Hamann Laustsen, Oyvind Omland Infection with MRSA CC398 Related to Occupational Exposure to Mink: A Case Report Arch Clin Med Case Rep 2019; 3 (5): 228-230 DOI: 10.26502/acmcr.96550085

A 59-year old man was hospitalized with dyspnoea, cough, and fever, which led to respiratory treatment, later complicated with large central pulmonary embolisms. The only positive finding in samples was MRSA CC398. The patient worked several times as a full-time employee at a mink farm, which was the only exposure to MRSA CC398 in the patient’s occupational history. The Danish Labour Market Insurance recognized the injury as an occupational disease; hence, exposure to LA-MRSA for working on mink farms is a new occupational risk factor in Denmark.

Viñas M et al. Occupational allergy to Spagulax® (Plantago ovata seed). Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;49(6):281-283.  doi:10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.21

A case of a 36-year-old male pharmaceutical laboratory worker is reported. On handling Spagulax® sachets whose content is a laxative called Plantago ovata, he immediately presented rhinoconjunctivitis. To test a work relation a specific allergy study included SDS-PAGE with Western Blot and specific nasal challenge to Plantago ovata extract. It turned out that the prick by prick for Spagulax® was negative. Total IgE: 126.5 U/mL. Western Blot recognized two proteins of 15 and 20 kDa in the extract of Plantago ovata and three proteins of 15, 18 and 50 kDa in the extract of Plantago lanceolata. The authors conclude this is a case of occupational allergy due to inhalation of and/or contact with Plantago ovata seeds. The article is to read free online through the link.